Myra’s Story – No Lists

It’s the Sunday before Christmas and Myra is having a struggle getting ready to drive over to St. Anthony’s Assisted Living to visit nolistsAunt Grace, her only remaining relative on her mother’s side. Aunt Grace is in her nineties, is mentally very alert, but she can’t walk due to arthritis and is virtually blind. It’s not a chore to visit her; it’s just that everything around the holidays is like dragging a heavy weight around. It would be easier to go to bed and forget about everything. Continue reading

Blog Carnival – Finding Personal Peace for December 15, 2013

Blog Carnival – Finding Personal Peace for December 15, 2013Welcome to the December 15, 2013 edition of Blog Carnival –  Finding Personal Peace containing 10 interesting articles on a variety of topics.

Thanks for visiting our Blog Carnival, Finding Personal Peace. Please review the subjects below and make note of any that interest you. At the bottom of the page, you will find a link that takes you to more information about each post. If you find a post you like, please make a comment to encourage them or even engage in a discussion with them.

anger

  • Lidiya presents A Minimalist Step-by-step Guide to Reacting in Tough Situations

depression

  • Adam Pasztor presents The Miracle Forest: How To Take Control Of Your Life

emotional issues

  • Jana presents The Pitfalls To Participating in A Pity-Party
  • Diane Mottl, MSW presents Be a Flicker of Light During the Holidays (Mental Health) | Being Truly Present
  • Lidiya presents Embrace Insecurity and Live the Life You Deserve
  • Lidiya presents Experience the Thrill of Becoming Emotionally Independent

relationships

  • emilynolin presents The Courage To Piss People Off
  • emilynolin presents The Paradox Of Attraction
  • Socratez presents Socratez Online – Expand Your Mind

social anxiety

To view the articles, Click here or click on Blog Carnival in the tabs at the top. You’ll want to check out these articles and share them in your circle of influence. We’ll be receiving submitted articles and posting them each week. Please share with your friends. Thanks.

Blog Carnival for Finding Personal Peace for June 30, 2013

Blog Carnival for Finding Personal Peace for June 30, 2013

Welcome to the June 30, 2013 of Finding Personal Peace with 41 articles on a range of interesting topics.

Thanks for visiting our Blog Carnival, Finding Personal Peace. Please review the subjects below and make note of any that interest you. At the bottom of the page, you will find a link that takes you to more information about each post. If you find a post you like, please make a comment to encourage them or even engage in a discussion with them.

children

  • Laura Anderson presents Expert Insights on Creating Happy Kids with Dr. Sharin Sherkat, Parent Strategist
  • Charlotte Morgan presents How to Survive the Days Leading Up to Summer Vacation
  • Brittany Harris presents Toys That Foster Development in 3 to 5 Year Olds
  • Mitchell Morris presents How to Supplement Your Child’s Education at Home
  • Kaitlyn Johnson presents 10 Ways to Avoid Spoiling Your Toddler
  • Jim Wilson presents 27 Blogs with Tons of Songs to Teach Your Kids to Sing | Babysitters
  • Tim Hall presents 24 Blogs Letting You in on the Secrets of How to Keep Your Kids Smart this Summer
  • David Thompsonn presents 18 Blogs Explain Brain Breaks and Why they are Important
  • Janet Golovine presents What Should You Do if You Witness a Parent Verbally Abusing Her Child?
  • Laura Anderson presents 30 Blogs Detailing Activities for Kids to Do Over Summer Break
  • Layla Martinez presents How to Help Your Children Develop Compassion
  • Denise Young presents 10 Kids’ Foods Considered Healthy That Aren’t
  • Jeff Moore presents 24 Blogs with Tips for Promoting Creative Writing in Kids
  • Carter White presents 27 Blogs with Methods to Teach Your Child How to Tell Time
  • Laura Anderson presents How to Tactfully Decline a Playdate Invitation
  • Diego Brown presents 30 Blogs with the Best Tips on Helping Your Child Prepare for Standardized Testing
  • Kevin Giffin presents 10 Reasons to Think Twice About Heading to Local Carnivals
  • Denise Thompson presents 10 Bus Safety Rules All Kids Should Know
  • Jeff Moore presents 30 Blogs with the Best Tips for Planning Your Child’s First Sleepover

emotional issues

  • Jana presents 3 Ways to Master Your Emotions : Wisdom Ink Magazine

family

  • Lisa Jackson presents 30 Blogs with the Best Tips for Your First Family Camping Trip
  • Kevin Giffin presents Free Summer Activities for the Family
  • Steve Jackson presents What to Look for When Buying Your First Family Car

other

  • Michelle Brown presents 10 of the Best iPhone Apps to Access on Your Nature Walk
  • Jessica Clark presents 10 Famous Crime Fighters Named Ken
  • Denise Young presents 30 Blogs with the Best Tips for International Travel
  • Jim Wilson presents 25 Blogs Featuring Copycat Recipes that You Can Make for Your Family Tonight | Babysitters
  • Jocelyn Scott presents How to Check Up on Your Nanny When You Don’t Have Nanny Cams
  • Cherry Liu presents 30 Blogs Sharing the Best Way to Plan a Housewarming Party
  • Shelby Martin presents 10 Red Flags to Look for When Interviewing for a Nanny Job
  • Jessica Clark presents 10 Famous Fashion Designers Named Ken
  • Denise Young presents 30 of the Best Blogs Presenting Inexpensive Ways to Make Frozen Snack Pops at Home
  • Dan Robinson presents 20 Blogs Describing the Benefits of Cinnamon in Your Life
  • Teri Jones presents Top Ten Things That Make You a Great Nanny
  • Brittany Harris presents 10 Signs That It’s Time to Quit Your Nanny Job
  • Shelby Martin presents 10 Red Flags to Look for When Interviewing a Nanny
  • Jim Wilson presents 21 of the Best Blogs Spotlighting Avocado Recipes | Babysitters
  • Michelle Brown presents 30 of the Best Blogs Containing Recipes to Make Your Own Beauty Products
  • Sharon Moore presents Dealing with the Grief of Leaving Your Nanny Job
  • Morgan presents Be

relationships

  • Amrita Goswami presents Invisible

To view the articles, Click here or click on Blog Carnival in the tabs at the top. You’ll want to check out these articles and share them in your circle of influence. We’ll be receiving submitted  articles and posting them every Sunday.

Help Someone You Love Deal with Extended Grief Simply and Effectively

Help Someone You Love Deal with Extended Grief Simply and EffectivelyGrief is a perfectly natural emotion. All of us deal with loss inevitably. At its least, grief can cause sorrow and mourning. At its worst, it can be completely debilitating. Don’t give up. You can deal with your extended grief in a simple and effective way right there in the privacy of your home computer, laptop, iPad, or smart phone.

Please don’t interpret anything in this article as being critical for feeling loss over the death of someone you love. It is both natural and necessary to work through the loss with friends, other loved ones, and by recalling cherished memories. We each deal with and express our grief in different ways.

And there is no attempt here to set a normal duration for grief. I’ve been grieving over one loss in our family for years now. I still feel the loss, but I also enjoy the memories and the joys of that relationship for so many years.

That form of grief is valid and it is not debilitating. It may bring tears; but the sad moment is gently put aside and life goes on.

On the other hand, grief can also render us incapable of any rational action, reasoned judgments, and make it impossible to enjoy on-going relationships. That sort of grief is harmful if it continues too long.

Common to most grief is a thought about what we lost. That could properly continue for many years. When we let those thoughts lead us to a period of reflection before putting them aside, that is a healthy response.

If we let those thoughts lead us to anxiety about other possible losses, becoming overwhelmed by depression, or being incapable of dealing with the required daily routine of life, we need to do something about it.

In a moment, you’ll see a very simple process you can use as often as you like to overcome your extended grief. Because I don’t want to leave you upset, I’m going to tell you about it and then direct you to try it – after you know what to expect.

Each moment of grief is initiated by a thought. If we dwell on the thought, it may be so intense that we seem to be reliving the actual loss again.

If you’re dealing with extended grief in your life these days, right now I want you to pause and think about your loss. But DON’T dwell on it. Immediately say to yourself, out loud, “I’m not going to think about that now.” If it recurs, say it again.

You’ll soon discover that the debilitating thought of grief will go away. It will go away every time you demand that it go away.

You can deal with your extended grief so simply that many people have trouble accepting it. The most effective way to control the thoughts that lead extended grief is to say to yourself, out loud, “I will not think about that right now.” Do it as often as necessary and do it out loud, “I will not think about that.”

Someone said, “That’s easier said than done.”

Not really. You have the built-in authority to decide what you want to think about. If a thought about grief causes you pain, don’t think that thought. It’s your choice. As you make that choice again and again, your subconscious remembers how you like to respond and will start to make your response automatically. It’s amazing how quickly this can happen.

Furthermore, you were made with a subconscious mind that has over time formed the opinion that you like to grieve because you dwell on it so much. Your subconscious, in an effort to please you, will keep sending your thoughts of grief again and again,

The process of choosing not to dwell on those thoughts will, over time, convince your subconscious that you do not want to think about that those things anymore. It’s this process that creates the habit of peace and breaks the habit of grief.

At some point, you won’t even realize you are thinking negative thoughts because your subconscious is automatically responding to the thoughts before they become conscious thoughts.

Nothing could be more effective than having your subconscious mind control your negative thinking for you before you even consciously think about it.

Resources you can use

Help someone you love deal with extended grief anxiety. Learn more at http://findingpersonalpeace.com/s005

You can use this idea for just about any negative emotion or habit that bothers you including extended grief anxiety.

I hope Finding Personal Peace helps you as much with your extended grief as it helped me with my anger problem.

Help Someone You Love Deal with Extended Grief Simply and Effectively

Rod Peeks

Thanks for reading our blog today. I invite you to respond in several ways: (1) Comment in the space below if you agree or disagree with what I’ve said. A dialogue could be interesting for all; (2) Share the post with your friends using the buttons below; and (3) sign up to get an email with each new post. There’s a place to do that on the right. Then you won’t have to remember to look for our subsequent posts. Thanks again!

How to Deal with Extended Grief Simply and Effectively

How to Deal with Extended Grief Simply and Effectively

Dealing with Grief

Grief is a perfectly natural emotion. All of us deal with loss inevitably. At its least, grief can cause sorrow and mourning. At its worst, it can be completely debilitating. Don’t give up. You can deal with your extended grief in a simple and effective way right there in the privacy of your home computer, laptop, iPad, or smart phone.

Please don’t interpret anything in this article as being critical for feeling loss over the death of someone you love. It is both natural and necessary to work through the loss with friends, other loved ones, and by recalling cherished memories. We each deal with and express our grief in different ways.

And there is no attempt here to set a normal duration for grief. I’ve been grieving over one loss in our family for years now. I still feel the loss, but I also enjoy the memories and the joys of that relationship for so many years.

That form of grief is valid and it is not debilitating. It may bring tears; but the sad moment is gently put aside and life goes on.

On the other hand, grief can also render us incapable of any rational action, reasoned judgments, and make it impossible to enjoy on-going relationships. That sort of grief is harmful if it continues too long.

Common to most grief is a thought about what we lost. That could properly continue for many years. When we let those thoughts lead us to a period of reflection before putting them aside, that is a healthy response.

If we let those thoughts lead us to anxiety about other possible losses, becoming overwhelmed by depression, or being incapable of dealing with the required daily routine of life, we need to do something about it.

In a moment, you’ll see a very simple process you can use as often as you like to overcome your extended grief. Because I don’t want to leave you upset, I’m going to tell you about it and then direct you to try it – after you know what to expect.

Each moment of grief is initiated by a thought. If we dwell on the thought, it may be so intense that we seem to be reliving the actual loss again.

If you’re dealing with extended grief in your life these days, right now I want you to pause and think about your loss. But DON’T dwell on it. Immediately say to yourself, out loud, “I’m not going to think about that now.” If it recurs, say it again.

You’ll soon discover that the debilitating thought will go away. It will go away every time you demand that it go away.

You can deal with your extended grief so simply that many people have trouble accepting it. The most effective way to control the thoughts that lead extended grief is to say to yourself, out loud, “I will not think about that right now.” Do it as often as necessary and do it out loud.

Someone said, “That’s easier said than done.”

Not really. You have the built-in authority to decide what you want to think about. If a thought causes you grief anxiety, don’t think that thought. It’s your choice. As you make that choice again and again, your subconscious remembers how you like to respond and will start to make your response automatically. It’s amazing how quickly this can happen.

Furthermore, you were made with a subconscious mind that has over time formed the opinion that you like dwelling on thoughts that make you grieve. The process of choosing not to dwell on those thoughts will, over time, convince your subconscious that you do not want to think about that those things anymore. It’s this process that creates the habit of peace and breaks the habit of grief.

At some point, you won’t even realize you are thinking negative thoughts that lead to grief anxiety because your subconscious is automatically responding to the thoughts before they become conscious thoughts.

Nothing could be more effective than having your subconscious mind control your negative thinking for you before you even consciously think about it.

Resources you can use

Take 3 minutes to learn more about handling your grief simply and effectively.

Check it out – http://findingpersonalpeace.com

You can use this idea for just about any negative emotion or habit that bothers you as well as grief anxiety.

I hope Finding Personal Peace helps you with your grief anxiety as much as it helped me with my anger problem.

How to Deal with Extended Grief Simply and Effectively

www.findingpersonalpeace.com

Thanks for reading our blog today. I invite you to respond in several ways: (1) Comment in the space below if you agree or disagree with what I’ve said. A dialogue could be interesting for all; (2) Share the post with your friends using the buttons below; and (3) sign up to get an email with each new post. There’s a place to do that on the right. Then you won’t have to remember to look for our subsequent posts. Thanks again!